Tag Archives: 1921

Bollywood Horror Movies at the North American Box Office

Bollywood horror movies are notorious duds at the North American box office. They open in a handful of theaters, make next to nothing, and disappear quickly. When Anushka Sharma announced that she would star in the horror film Pari — produced by her own company, Clean Slate Films — it raised the question of whether her presence as a marquee star could boost a genre movie’s ceiling internationally.

Horror films remain on the fringes of Bollywood. Most aren’t released in theaters internationally and are left to find their way into homes via DVD or streaming video. Still, when the Hindi film industry collectively decided (deliberately or not) in 2012 to increase the number of Bollywood movies released in North American theaters by a third — from 36 titles in 2011 to 48 in 2012, with an average of 50 Bollywood movies released here yearly since then — that left a lot of open slots to fill, leaving room for niche fare like horror flicks.

That’s not to say there was a Hindi horror boom in the United States and Canada. Most years only see one or two scary films released in theaters, plus a few titles that aren’t traditional horror fare like the horror comedy Go Goa Gone or the survival horror flick Roar: Tigers of the Sundarbans.

Pari released in 45 theaters in North America: nine in Canada and 36 in the United States. That’s one more theater than carried NH10 — the maiden production from Sharma’s Clean Slate Films — back in 2015, but 42 fewer than the 87 that carried Clean Slate’s romantic comedy Phillauri last year (all numbers per Bollywood Hungama). Still, for a Hindi horror movie in North America, 45 theaters is about as big a theatrical footprint as you’ll find.

For the purposes of comparing to Pari, let’s look at other supernatural horror movies (which make up the bulk of Bollywood horror flicks). Here’s how such films have fared in North America over the years, in terms of: number of theaters they opened in; how much they earned total in their opening weekend; the average amount earned per theater in that opening weekend; and their final earnings total.

2012
Raaz 3: 28 theaters; $95,301; $3,404 average; $150,716 total
Bhoot Returns: 15 theaters; $3,478; $232 average; $3,478 total

2013
Ek Thi Daayan: 48 theaters; $65,857; $1,372 average; $112,135 total

2014
Ragini MMS 2: 20 theaters; $16,317; $815 average; $16,317 total

2016
1920 London: 38 theaters; $16,204; $426 average; $24,854 total

2017
Dobaara: See Your Evil: 30 theaters; $7,110; $237 average; $11,002 total

2018
1921: 10 theaters; $4,583; $458 average; $7,850 total

Pari opened with earnings of $118,906 — better than the final totals of all but one film in the list above (Raaz 3). Pari‘s $2,642 per-theater average was less than Raaz 3‘s $3,404 average, which only proves that Raaz 3 deserved a higher theater count than it got.

Where Pari really differentiated itself was in its second weekend performance. It held onto 54% of its opening weekend business ($64,247), which was leaps and bounds ahead of Raaz 3‘s 27% retention rate and Ek Thi Daayan‘s 21% carry over. By the end of its third weekend, Pari had earned $320,641 — more than double the next highest total on the list above.

The major takeaway from these numbers is that Hindi films in niche genres are more heavily dependent upon star power than those in more popular genres like romantic comedy or drama. The numbers also demonstrate which stars are able to draw North American Bollywood fans to the theater on their name alone. Sharma is obvious, as further bolstered by the box office success of her other home productions: NH10 ($319,872 total) and Phillauri ($471,522 total). Raaz 3 and Ek Thi Daayan star Emraan Hashmi is another clear box office draw, although his popular co-stars — Bipasha Bashu in Raaz 3 and the trio of Konkona Sen Sharma, Kalki Koechlin, and Huma Qureshi in Ek Thi Daayan — certainly helped. Both movies took in more than $100,000 here.

Yet no other recent Hindi horror film released theatrically in North America managed to earn even $25,000. Qureshi couldn’t do it opposite her real-life sibling, Saqib Saleem, in Dobaara. Despite their own name recognition and the fact that their movies were sequels, Sunny Leone and Sharman Joshi fell short with Ragini MMS 2 and 1920 London, respectively. With such dependence on the caliber of the cast, one wonders if Bollywood horror films without top-tier stars wouldn’t fare better by releasing straight to streaming services here in North America and skipping theaters entirely.

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Bollywood Box Office: January 19-21, 2018

The North American box office quietly chugged along without any new Hindi movies to lure patrons into theaters during the weekend of January 19-21, 2018. Tiger Zinda Hai closed its fifth weekend with $43,600 from 24 theaters ($1,817 average), bringing its total to $5,884,047. Given its decent per-screen average — and the fact that Padman shifted its release date from this coming Friday to February 9 — Tiger Zinda Hai should stick around in a handful of theaters for another weekend.

Mukkabaaz has earned a decent amount for a movie in really limited release: $72,427 so far following a weekend that brought in another $9,759 from seven theaters ($1,394 average). That total belies a comical disparity in the contributions from the United States and Canada, with Canada accounting for just $972 after two weekends of release.

1921 earned $838 from five US theaters, bringing its total to $7,850. Its performance so far is comparable to that of its predecessor, 2016’s 1920 London, which posted first- and second-weekend per-theater averages of $426 and $197, respectively. 1921 averaged $458 and $168 in its first two weeks in theaters.

Fukrey Returns earned $72 from one theater in its seventh weekend of release, bringing its total to $396,604.

Source: Rentrak, via Bollywood Hungama

In Theaters: January 19, 2018

No new Hindi films open in the Chicago area on Friday, January 19, 2018, making way for next weekend’s double feature. MovieMax Cinemas in Niles carries over 1921, and the AMC South Barrington 24 gives a second week to Mukkabaaz. Both theaters hold on to Tiger Zinda Hai for a fifth weekend.

Other Indian and Pakistani movies showing in Chicagoland this weekend:

Bollywood Box Office: January 12-14, 2018

The first new Hindi releases of 2018 met very different fates in their opening weekend in North America. Mukkabaaz fared the better of the two from January 12-14, 2018, collecting $39,489 from 17 theaters ($2,323 average). Canada’s contribution to that total was $470 from a single theater, though to be fair, the film already played in the country last fall during the Toronto International Film Festival.

The weekend’s other new release, 1921 — the latest sequel in the 1920 horror franchise — only opened in the United States, where it took in $4,583 from ten theaters ($458 average). Eek!

Tiger Zinda Hai wrapped up its fourth weekend here with $94,725 from 49 theaters ($1,933 average), bringing its total to $5,775,529. Fukrey Returns got a sixth weekend at a single theater, earning $205 and raising its total North American earnings to $396,389.

Source: Rentrak, via Bollywood Hungama

Opening January 12: 1921 and Mukkabaaz

Two new Hindi films open in Chicago on January 12, 2018, albeit in very small release. The horror sequel 1921 gets the bigger theatrical footprint, opening in MovieMax Cinemas in Niles and AMC South Barrington 24 in South Barrington.

Also hitting the South Barrington 24 on Friday is director Anurag Kashyap’s boxing drama Mukkabaaz, which has a runtime of 2 hrs. 25 min.

Tiger Zinda Hai gets a fourth weekend at MovieMax and the South Barrington 24.

Other Indian and Pakistani movies showing in Chicagoland this weekend: