Tag Archives: The Attacks of 26/11

Opening March 29: Himmatwala

At long last, a likely Bollywood blockbuster is set to open in Chicago area theaters. Himmatwala stars Ajay Devgn in a remake of the 1983 action flick of the same name. In Singham, Devgn’s open-handed slap attacks were accompanied by a lion’s roar, and now he wrestles a tiger in Himmatwala. Is this big cat theme deliberate?

Himmatwala opens on Friday, March 29, 2013, at the Big Cinemas Golf Glen 5 in Niles, AMC South Barrington 30 in South Barrington, and Regal Cantera Stadium 17 in Warrenville. It has a listed runtime of 2 hrs. 30 min.

Last weekend’s new release, Rangrezz, does not get a second week after earning an absolutely pathetic $4,318 from 11 theaters in the United States. Other notable earnings figures from last weekend include $16,951 for Kai Po Che! from 18 theaters and just $1,006 (yikes!) for The Attacks of 26/11 from 51 theaters.

Other Indian movies showing at the Golf Glen 5 this weekend include Chennaiyil Oru Naal (Tamil), Jaffa (Telugu), Kedi Billa Killadi Ranga (Tamil), and Swamy Ra Ra (Telugu).

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Opening March 22: Rangrezz

Pickings remain slim in Chicago area theaters. Only one new Hindi movie opens locally on March 22, 2013, and it’s not the one I wanted. Instead of the creepy-looking Bipasha Basu/Nawazuddin Siddiqui horror flick Aatma, we get Rangrezz, producer Vashu Bhagnani’s latest attempt to turn his son, Jackky, into a Bollywood star, against the wishes of audiences everywhere.

Rangrezz opens on Friday at the Big Cinemas Golf Glen 5 in Niles. It has a listed runtime of 2 hrs. 20 min.

The Golf Glen 5 is the only theater in the Chicago area carrying any Indian movies this weekend, including the Hindi films The Attacks of 26/11 and Kai Po Che! (which has earned $1,080,384 from four weeks in U.S. theaters), as well as Paradesi (Tamil) and Romans (Malayalam).

Just four weeks after its theatrical release, The Attacks of 26/11 joins the catalog of films of available on Eros Now on Friday. Like 3G, it’s considered a premium title that’s free to subscribers or available for a 48-hour rental for $1.99.

In Theaters March 15, 2013

Update: The new release 3G is currently available on Eros Now not only to subscribers but on a 48-hour rental basis for $1.99. However, due to rights restrictions, the film isn’t available online in India, Pakistan, Burma, Fiji, UAE, Mauritius, Kenya, or South Africa.

Uh-oh. This is the second weekend in a row with no new Hindi movies opening in Chicago area theaters. The absence of Jolly LLB isn’t a surprise, but I expected Y-Films’ Mere Dad Ki Maruti to release here. I’m still hopeful that we’ll get the Bipasha Basu horror flick Aatma next week, but there’s a chance Chicago area Bollywood fans will have to go without until Himmatwala debuts on March 29.

The good news is that Eros Now subscribers can watch 3G on the streaming service starting this Friday, March 15, the same day that it opens in India. That bad news for Neil Nitin Mukesh fans is that the failure of 3G to get a large roll out on the heels of a very small U.S. release of David last month seems to definitively rule him out as a bankable international leading man. I expect we won’t see much of him in The States in the future outside of roles in ensemble pictures like 7 Khoon Maaf.

In the meantime, Kai Po Che! — which has earned $1,013,738 from three weeks in U.S. theaters — carries over for a fourth week at the Big Cinemas Golf Glen 5 in Niles, AMC South Barrington 30 in South Barrington, and Regal Cantera Stadium 17 in Warrenville.

The Golf Glen 5 is also holding over The Attacks of 26/11 for a third week, as well as Back Bench Student (Telugu), Paradesi (Tamil), and Romans (Malayalam).

In Theaters March 8, 2013

For the first time in months, there are no new Hindi movies opening in Chicago area theaters this weekend. The sequel Saheb, Biwi aur Gangster Returns didn’t make the cut locally, which isn’t a surprise given that the original Saheb, Biwi aur Gangster earned a pathetic $13,634 in the two weeks it spent in U.S. theaters in 2011.

As of Friday, March 8, 2013, Kai Po Che! remains the most widely available Hindi movie showing in Chicagoland. After earning $876,568 from its first two weeks in the U.S., it carries over at the AMC River East 21 in Chicago, Big Cinemas Golf Glen 5 in Niles, AMC South Barrington 30 in South Barrington, and Regal Cantera Stadium 17 in Warrenville. Many theaters have cut back on the number of showings per day of Kai Po Che! and other niche films to free up screenspace for Oz The Great and Powerful, so make sure to check the schedule before heading to the theater.

With first weekend U.S. earnings of $159,619, The Attacks of 26/11 gets a second weekend at the Golf Glen 5, South Barrington 30, and Cantera 17. The Golf Glen 5 is the only area theater holding over last week’s other new release, I, Me aur Main, which presumably fared even worse at the box office.

Other Indian movies showing at the Golf Glen 5 this weekend include the Telugu film Gundello Godari and the Malayalam film Manjadikuru (“Lucky Red Seeds“).

Movie Review: The Attacks of 26/11 (2013)

TheAttacksof_26111.5 Stars (out of 4)

Buy the DVD at Amazon
Buy the soundtrack at Amazon

A case can be made that it’s too soon to make a feature film about the Mumbai terrorist attacks of November 26, 2008. The problem with The Attacks of 26/11 isn’t one of timing, but of tone. Director Ram Gopal Varma’s thriller-meets-dramatic-reenactment is exploitative and lacks a compelling narrative.

Obviously, the circumstances of the brazen nighttime attack on landmarks throughout Mumbai are compelling in themselves, but we already know the details from news reports. Ten terrorists from Pakistan came ashore in Mumbai and proceeded to detonate explosives and shoot people at sites around the city, including the train station, a popular cafe, and a luxury hotel. Over a hundred people were killed and hundreds more injured. The only terrorist to survive was himself executed on November 21, 2012.

The first half of The Attacks of 26/11 focuses on the early hours of the days-long massacre. Terrorists are shown navigating the city to their target locations before murdering civilians en masse. Deaths are shown in gory, revolting detail. A girl with a bullet wound to the arm waits for rescue in the train station. A hotel manager’s brain explodes out the side of his head when shot.

As if the gory scenes weren’t off-putting enough, Varma employs typical thriller and horror techniques to add dramatic tension. Violins trill as a receptionist creeps toward a crying infant in a hotel lobby. The visuals shift into slow motion as the receptionist is shot repeatedly in the chest. Offscreen, a gun fires and the baby stops crying.

In a horror movie, it’s fun when the violins trill as the co-ed cautiously walks to the door we know she shouldn’t open. Here, the effect is sickening because the deaths of real people are being treated for cheap thrills. These are people who died just five years ago, not in some war that took place long before the advent of social media and cable news.

The attacks shouldn’t be off-limits for filmmakers, but any film made about them needs to inform, enlighten, or otherwise add to the conversation about them. Varma had the opportunity to do so, had he properly utilized Nana Patekar’s character, the Joint Police Commissioner. This film should’ve been told from his perspective with him as the main character, providing the audience with a guide through such emotionally overwhelming material.

More often than not, Varma shows the Commissioner (his character only has a title, not a name) sitting before a government panel telling them what happened rather than showing the events from his perspective as they happened. When the character participates actively, he does so in redundant flashbacks. For example, the Commissioner tells the panel that he was in the shower when he got the first call from the police control room. Then the camera shows him in the shower, and his wife tells him that the control room just called.

This redundancy and the formality of the government panel setting keep the audience at arm’s length. The panel would’ve been fine as a framing device, but not as the source of the running narrative. Patekar’s best scenes are those when he’s active, fielding calls in the control room or interrogating the only terrorist captured alive, Kasab (Sanjeev Jaiswal).

We see some of the Commissioner’s panic as he tries to orchestrate a response to the attacks, but we are spared the emotional torment he surely experienced afterward. The Commissioner tells the panel that some of the police officers who died were his friends. Since a note at the beginning of the movie explains that some details were altered for the sake of the narrative, why not include a scene in which the Commissioner wishes his friends good luck on what would be their final mission?

Had the audience been encouraged to make a personal connection with the characters, The Attacks of 26/11 could have been emotionally effective beyond the natural human empathy one feels for the victims. Varma’s focus on the spectacle makes the film feel tawdry.

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Opening March 1: I, Me Aur Main and The Attacks of 26/11

Two more new Hindi movies are set to open in the Chicago area on March 1, 2013. The romantic drama I, Me Aur Main stars John Abraham as a pampered man-child opposite Chitrangada Singh and Prachi Desai.

I, Me Aur Main opens on Friday at the Big Cinemas Golf Glen 5 in Niles, AMC South Barrington 30 in South Barrington, and Regal Cantera Stadium 17 in Warrenville. It has a listed runtime of 1 hr. 46 min.

Director Ram Gopal Varma’s thriller The Attacks of 26/11 also opens in area theaters on Friday. Given the relative freshness of the wounds inflicted by the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks, I’m curious to see if RGV will rein in some of his more eccentric directorial quirks and tell a more somber, straightforward story.

The Attacks of 26/11 opens on Friday at all of the above theaters and has a listed runtime of 1 hr. 59 min.

Kai Po Che! posted strong first-weekend U.S. earnings of $522,765, meriting a second week in all of the above theaters plus the AMC River East 21 in Chicago. The disappointing gangster drama Zila Ghaziabad, predictably, does not get a second week.

On Friday, Special 26 begins its fourth week at the South Barrington 30, while ABCD departs local theaters with total U.S. earnings of $218,257.

Other Indian movies showing at the Golf Glen 5 on Friday include Kammath & Kammath (Malayalam) and Mr. Pellikoduku (Telugu).