Tag Archives: Bulbbul

Movie Review: Bulbbul (2020)

4 Stars (out of 4)

Watch Bulbbul on Netflix

With her first go as a feature film director, screenwriter and lyricist Anvita Dutt proves herself a master of atmosphere in the gorgeous gothic horror movie Bulbbul.

The story begins in 1881 somewhere in the Bengal Presidency at the wedding of Bulbbul (Ruchi Mahajan), a precocious 5-year-old who doesn’t really understand what’s happening. She is reassured in the carriage ride to her new home by Satya (Varun Buddhadev), a boy a few years older than her that she assumes is the person she’s been married to. Only upon arriving at the lavish estate of Lord Indranil (Rahul Bose) does she learn that her husband is not Satya but Indranil himself, Satya’s much older brother.

While Indranil waits for his child-bride to grow up, Bulbbul and Satya become inseparable companions. He regales her with legends of the “demon woman,” a witch who prowls the trees at night on feet turned backwards, hoping to find the little princess and gobble her up. They share the palace with Indranil’s identical twin brother Mahendra (also Bose) — who has an intellectual disability and an unsettling fascination with Bulbbul — and Mahendra’s beautiful but jealous wife, Binodini (Paoli Dam).

Two decades later, Satya (now Avinash Tiwary) returns home after several years abroad to find his home radically changed. Mahendra was murdered, Binodini lives in a colony with other widows, Indranil left the palace, and Bulbbul (now Tripti Dimri) rules in his place. The bookish, demure girl Satya remembers has become confident and aloof. She lounges, fanning herself with an ostentatious fan made of peacock feathers. Satya asks Bulbbul, “Where did the sweet little lady I knew disappear? What did you do with her?” “I gobbled her up,” she teases.

Something is clearly wrong in the jurisdiction, but what is a matter of opinion. Satya wants to solve a series unexplained murders, including Mahendra’s. There’s also the matter of the blood-red night sky and sense of foreboding that pervades the woods around the palace. But Bulbbul and her close confidant, Dr. Sudip (Parambrata Chattopadhyay), are more concerned about domestic issues, like the suspicious injuries sustained by Master Dinkar’s wife.

Violence against women is a theme throughout the film, and a couple of scenes are quite brutal. Not the scenes of violence themselves, but shots of the grisly aftermath. Dutt is careful not to make the violent acts in any way titillating. The scenes are simply sad, accompanied by a heartbreaking musical theme from composer Amit Trivedi.

Rather than focusing on the violent acts themselves, the story highlights a key mechanism that allows such violence against women to go unchecked: the otherwise good men who refuse to see it, as personified by Satya. He’s not violent, but he won’t believe that the men around him are. When Bulbbul and Sudip bring up Master Dinkar (Subhasis Chakraborty), Satya’s first reaction is to call him “a fine man.” Satya is so ensconced within the ruling patriarchy that he assumes that the way other men treat him is the way they treat everyone, and he’s willing to accept their version of events without question. Satya is more suspicious of those who challenge his perception of reality — especially an outsider, like Sudip.

Tiwary is successful at portraying Satya as a nice enough guy who just doesn’t get it, but whose ignorance has devastating consequences. Dimri’s ability to convey how much Bulbbul adores Satya amplifies the significance of those consequences.

Dimri has to play essentially two characters: Bulbbul before Satya leaves, and Bulbbul after he returns. She’s so good at both, but she’s particularly fun to watch as Bulbbul the ruler. The film’s best scenes are between Bulbbul and Sudip, Satya’s foil. Chattopadhyay is terrific when he plays the sidekick to a powerful woman, as he did in Kahaani.

Bulbbul‘s most memorable element is its color palette. Dutt uses filters liberally to set the mood of scenes, deploying super saturated tones for specific effect. The red night sky is discomforting, but it’s surprisingly bright. By contrast, the interior of the palace after dark is a heavy blue that allows shadows to proliferate. It doesn’t have the same unnatural quality of the sky outside, but it feels more dangerous. Dutt’s bold and effective use of color in Bulbbul sets a high bar for her next project — one that she seems more than capable of reaching.

Links

Streaming Video News: June 26, 2020

I updated my list of Bollywood movies on Netflix with the new Netflix Original film Bulbbul, from Anushka Sharma’s production company Clean Slate Films. It’s really good, and I hope to have my review up soon. Other new additions this week include the 2020 Telugu movie Krishna and His Leela and the older Hindi releases Vivah and Prem Ratan Dhan Payo (which is okay). Netflix also made changes to two films already on the service: Seven and Thackeray. Instead of one entry with a drop-down menu that allowed you to choose the language, Netflix made individual entries for each language version of the movie. Seven is available in Tamil and Telugu, and Thackeray is available in Hindi and Marathi.

Be sure to check out the Expiring Soon section of my Netflix page, as a bunch of movies and series are set to leave Netflix on July 1.

I also updated my list of Bollywood movies on Amazon Prime with dozens of Indian and Pakistani titles added in the last week. Out of nowhere, Prime added the brand new Hindi series Rasbhari (also in 4K UHD), starring Swara Bhaskar. Recently added 2020 releases include Cheema Prema Madhyalo Bhama (Telugu), Janaki Nayakan (Malayalam), and Prawaas (Marathi). Amazon also moved the digital premiere of the Kannada film Law to July 17.

[Disclaimer: all of my Amazon links include an affiliate tag, and I may earn a commission on purchases made via those links. Thanks for helping to support this website!]

Streaming Video News: June 11, 2020

I updated my list of Bollywood movies on Amazon Prime with today’s global premiere of the new Amitabh Bachchan-Ayushmann Khurrana comedy Gulabo Sitabo (also available in 4K UHD) — the first major Hindi film to skip theaters and release straight to digital. Amazon added dozens of other Indian titles in the last week, including the 2020 Telugu movie Pressure Cooker.

I also updated my list of Bollywood movies on Netflix with today’s addition of the 2019 Hindi film Axone. Netflix made two big announcements this week: first, a June 24 release date for Bulbbul, a creepy looking Netflix Original movie from Anushka Sharma’s production house. Second, it announced that the military biopic Gunjan Saxena: The Kargil Girl will release straight to Netflix rather than release theatrically. No official premiere date was given.

[Disclaimer: all of my Amazon links include an affiliate tag, and I may earn a commission on purchases made via those links. Thanks for helping to support this website!]