Movie Review: Badla (2019)

2.5 Stars (out of 4)

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There’s a lot to like in Badla, but I’m not sure how much any of it matters, since the film’s central mystery is so obvious. I’m no mystery buff, but I sussed things out in the first fifteen minutes.

Wealthy London CEO Naina Sethi (Taapsee Pannu) stands accused of murdering her lover Arjun (Tony Luke) after she wakes up in a hotel room next to his dead body and a pile of cash. She insists that an unknown blackmailer lured them to the hotel, and that the blackmailer knocked her out before killing Arjun.

With Naina stuck in her apartment under house arrest, renowned lawyer Badal Gupta (Amitabh Bachchan) arrives to prepare her for trial. Naina’s main attorney, Jimmy (Manav Kaul) — who’s off tracking down a potential witness — says that Badal is the best in the business, and Badal himself assures Naina that he wants her case to be his final victory before retirement.

Naina agrees to tell Badal the whole truth, but she’s surprised when he brings up the case of a missing young man. Though she obfuscates at first, Badal’s hunch is right — there is a connection between the missing man and her dead boyfriend.

Though the entire present-day portion of the story takes place in Naina’s apartment, we see relevant events of the past through flashbacks. Badal and Naina suggest differing interpretations of what happened, and Pannu and Luke alter their characters depending on the version of the story being told. Bachchan’s performance is more limited because his character only interacts with Naina and only within her apartment. And his character’s approach to his client seems overly adversarial.

Badla is based on the 2016 Spanish thriller The Invisible Guest, and it makes sense that Kahaani director Sujoy Ghosh would be drawn to its story. Pannu’s role was originally written for a man, and the character’s gender was changed at her insistence. That allowed Ghosh to make a second film about a woman from London whose guile and tenacity are underestimated by the men around her, involved in a crime that’s more complicated than it first seems.

Where Badla falls short of Kahaani‘s success is in the film’s the central mystery and the way information is parceled out. Even as Kahaani‘s heroine Vidya — a pregnant woman played by Vidya Balan — finds new details about her husband’s disappearance, the audience can never be completely sure what’s going on. She’s an unconventional lead for this type of movie, so we don’t have enough information or points of reference to figure things out far in advance.

Badla is more conventional, despite its someone novel technique of keeping Naina and Badal in her apartment and reenacting flashbacks of dubious veracity. Arjun’s murder is a locked-room mystery, so the audience knows to look for clues and discrepancies in the story as presented. The film also shows early on the incident that stars the chain of events ending in Arjun’s murder, so we know to be suspicious of the story we’re being told from that point on.

As I said above, I’m not even a mystery aficionado, but I wrote in my notes early into the film what I suspected was the answer to Badla’s riddle. From that point on, it was just a matter of the film finally proving my guess correct. The story never really give me a reason to doubt my assumption.

Badla’s short runtime of 118 minutes meant my vindication came quickly, but it was an unsuspenseful two hours. Thankfully, the performances are pretty entertaining, both by Pannu and Luke as well as Amrita Singh, who plays the missing man’s mother. Also, Amaal Mallik’s songs “Kyun Rabba” and “Tum Na Aaye” are fantastic. Badla isn’t a bad way to spend a couple of hours, it’s just a little disappointing as a mystery.

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9 thoughts on “Movie Review: Badla (2019)

  1. Thank You

    Thank you for your review; work like yours saves me time and money on inadequately executed remakes of Spanish-language films. First there was Murder 3 (from The Hidden Face) and now there is this one. At this rate I dread Bollywood’s discovery of Nine Queens, which is tougher to remake than the film you reviewed and The Hidden Face. Hopefully the incompetent components within Bollywood do not discover Nine Queens and its ilk.

    Separately, thank you for your information about the Chinese market success of Andhadhun; maybe that success encourages more original screenplays being produced in Bollywood.

    Regards.

    Reply
  2. Thank You

    Thanks for the information regarding Bluffmaster!; I managed to suffer through “Bluff …” but somehow my brain never managed to connect it to “Nine …”. I saw “Nine …” after “Bluff …”. The thought, ‘Oh, I see where they got the idea from’ never crossed my cranial recesses.

    I guess “Bluff …” is to “Nine …” what “OK Jaanu” is to “O Kadhal Kanmani” when comes to remakes from other languages.

    Based on your Bluffmaster! review, it’s unclear whether you managed to see Nine Queens. If not, allow me to return the favor for your work and opine that Nine Queens is 4 out of 4 stars on the Thank You Scale [trademark not pending], even though strictly speaking, given the scope of your publishing enterprise, this comment should be disqualified.

    Regards.

    Reply
    1. Kathy Post author

      I always appreciate being steered in the right direction, TY. ๐Ÿ™‚ I haven’t seen Nine Queens, so I’ll have to add that to my “Must Watch” list.

      Reply
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